Hash Generator

Hash Generator is a tool to generate the hash value of a provided string instantly. Supported algorithms MD5, SHA-256, SHA-512, SHA-384, RIPEMD160 and many more

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Identical with your Hash: N/A
Documentation 📝

What is Hash Generator?

Hash Generator is not only a free online tool in our generators family to generate the hash value of a provided string instantly, but also a random hash key generator that allows you to compare the generated hash value against an expected one to check if they’re identical.

How to use the tool as random hash key generator

To randomly generate a hash key, you can put in a random string, or use our Password Generator to generate a random password and use it as the input string

What is a cryptographic hash function?

A cryptographic hash function (CHF) is a mathematical algorithm that maps data of an arbitrary size (often called the “message”) to a bit array of a fixed size (the “hash value”, “hash”, or “message digest”). It is a one-way function, that is, a function for which is practically infeasible to invert or reverse the computation. Ideally, the only way to find a message that produces a given hash is to attempt a brute-force search of possible inputs to see if they produce a match, or use a rainbow table of matched hashes. Cryptographic hash function employed by our Hash Generator is a basic tool of modern cryptography.

Cryptographic hash functions, using by our Hash Generator, have many information-security applications, notably in digital signatures, message authentication codes (MACs), and other forms of authentication. They can also be used as ordinary hash functions, to index data in hash tables, for fingerprinting, to detect duplicate data or uniquely identify files, and as checksums to detect accidental data corruption. Indeed, in information-security contexts, cryptographic hash values are sometimes called (digital) fingerprints, checksums, or just hash values, even though all these terms stand for more general functions with rather different properties and purposes.

Cryptographic hash algorithms

There are many cryptographic hash algorithms employed by our Hash Generator tool; this section lists a few algorithms that are referenced relatively often:

  • MD5: MD5 was designed by Ronald Rivest in 1991 to replace an earlier hash function, MD4, and was specified in 1992 as RFC 1321. Collisions against MD5 can be calculated within seconds which makes the algorithm unsuitable for most use cases where a cryptographic hash is required. MD5 produces a digest of 128 bits (16 bytes).
  • SHA-1: SHA-1 was developed as part of the U.S. Government’s Capstone project. The original specification – now commonly called SHA-0 – of the algorithm was published in 1993 under the title Secure Hash Standard, FIPS PUB 180, by U.S. government standards agency NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology). It was withdrawn by the NSA shortly after publication and was superseded by the revised version, published in 1995 in FIPS  PUB 180-1 and commonly designated SHA-1. Collisions against the full SHA-1 algorithm can be produced using the shattered attack and the hash function should be considered broken. SHA-1 produces a hash digest of 160 bits (20 bytes).

    Documents may refer to SHA-1 as just “SHA”, even though this may conflict with the other Secure Hash Algorithms such as SHA-0, SHA-2, and SHA-3.

  • SHA-2: SHA-2 (Secure Hash Algorithm 2) is a set of cryptographic hash functions designed by the United States National Security Agency (NSA), first published in 2001. They are built using the Merkle–Damgård structure, from a one-way compression function itself built using the Davies–Meyer structure from a (classified) specialized block cipher.

    SHA-2 basically consists of two hash algorithms: SHA-256 and SHA-512. SHA-224 is a variant of SHA-256 with different starting values and truncated output. SHA-384 and the lesser-known SHA-512/224 and SHA-512/256 are all variants of SHA-512. SHA-512 is more secure than SHA-256 and is commonly faster than SHA-256 on 64-bit machines such as AMD64.

    The output size in bits is given by the extension to the “SHA” name, so SHA-224 has an output size of 224 bits (28 bytes); SHA-256, 32 bytes; SHA-384, 48 bytes; and SHA-512, 64 bytes.

  • SHA-3: SHA-3 (Secure Hash Algorithm 3) was released by NIST on August 5, 2015. SHA-3 is a subset of the broader cryptographic primitive family Keccak. The Keccak algorithm is the work of Guido Bertoni, Joan Daemen, Michael Peeters, and Gilles Van Assche. Keccak is based on a sponge construction which can also be used to build other cryptographic primitives such as a stream cipher. SHA-3 provides the same output sizes as SHA-2: 224, 256, 384, and 512 bits.

    Configurable output sizes can also be obtained using the SHAKE-128 and SHAKE-256 functions. Here the -128 and -256 extensions to the name imply the security strength of the function rather than the output size in bits.

  • RIPEMD-160: RIPEMD (RACE Integrity Primitives Evaluation Message Digest) is a family of cryptographic hash functions developed in Leuven, Belgium, by Hans Dobbertin, Antoon Bosselaers, and Bart Preneel at the COSIC research group at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, and first published in 1996. RIPEMD was based upon the design principles used in MD4 and is similar in performance to the more popular SHA-1. RIPEMD-160 has, however, not been broken. As the name implies, RIPEMD-160 produces a hash digest of 160 bits (20 bytes).

Credit
The documentation uses material from the Wikipedia article “Cryptographic hash function”, which are released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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